NAME

Mail::Sender - module for sending mails with attachments through an SMTP server

Version 0.7.12


SYNOPSIS

 use Mail::Sender;
 $sender = new Mail::Sender
  {smtp => 'mail.yourdomain.com', from => 'your@address.com'};
 $sender->MailFile({to => 'some@address.com',
  subject => 'Here is the file',
  msg => "I'm sending you the list you wanted.",
  file => 'filename.txt'});


DESCRIPTION

Mail::Sender provides an object oriented interface to sending mails. It doesn't need any outer program. It connects to a mail server directly from Perl, using Socket.

Sends mails directly from Perl through a socket connection.


CONSTRUCTORS

new Mail::Sender
 new Mail::Sender ([from [,replyto [,to [,smtp [,subject [,headers [,boundary]]]]]]])
 new Mail::Sender {[from => 'somebody@somewhere.com'] , [to => 'else@nowhere.com'] [...]}

Prepares a sender. This doesn't start any connection to the server. You have to use $Sender-Open> or $Sender-OpenMultipart> to start talking to the server.

The parameters are used in subsequent calls to $Sender-Open> and $Sender-OpenMultipart>. Each such call changes the saved variables. You can set smtp,from and other options here and then use the info in all messages.

 from      = the senders e-mail address
 fake_from = the address that will be shown in headers
             If not specified we use the value of "from"
 replyto   = the reply-to address
 to        = the recipient's address(es)
 fake_to   = the address that will be shown in headers
             If not specified we use the value of "to"
 cc        = address(es) to send a copy (carbon copy)
 fake_cc   = the address that will be shown in headers
             If not specified we use the value of "cc"
 bcc       = address(es) to send a copy (blind carbon copy)
             these addresses will not be visible in the mail!
 smtp      = the IP or domain address of your SMTP (mail) server
             This is the name of your LOCAL mail server, do not try to guess
             and contact directly the adressee's mailserver!
 subject   = the subject of the message
 headers   = the additional headers
 boundary  = the message boundary
 multipart = the MIME subtype for the whole message (Mixed/Related/Alternative)
  you may need to change this setting if you want to send a HTML body with some
  inline images, or if you want to post the message in plain text as well as
  HTML (alternative). See the examples at the end of the docs.
  You may also use the nickname "subtype".
 type      = the content type of a multipart message, may be usefull for
             multipart/related
 ctype     = the content type of a single part message
  Please do not confuse these two. The 'type' parameter is used to specify
  the overall content type of a multipart message (for example a HTML document
  with inlined images) while ctype is an ordinary content type for a single
  part message. For example a HTML mail message.
 encoding  = encoding of a single part message or the body of a multipart
  message. If the text of the message contains some extended characters or
  very long lines you should use 'encoding => "Quoted-printable"' in the
  call to Open(), OpenMultipart(), MailMsg() or MailFile().
  Keep in mind that if you use some encoding you should either use SendEnc()
  or encode the data yourself !
 charset   = the charset of the message
 client    = the name of the client computer. During the connection you send
  the mailserver your name. Usualy a "localhost" is sufficient, but sometimes
  you need to specify some real name. Usualy something like
  `hostname`.'.mycompany.com'. But I leave this for you.
  Mail::Sender doesn't try to guess the name, it sends "localhost" if you do
  not specify otherwise.
 priority   = 1 = highest, 2 = high, 3 = normal
  "X-Priority: 1 (Highest)";
 debug      = "/path/to/debug/file.txt"
          or
            = \*FILEHANDLE
          or
            = $FH
                        All the conversation with the server will be logged to that file or handle.
                        All lines in the file should end with CRLF (the Windows and Internet format).
                        If even a single one of them does not, please let me know!
 return codes:
  ref to a Mail::Sender object =  success
  -1 = $smtphost unknown
  -2 = socket() failed
  -3 = connect() failed
  -4 = service not available
  -5 = unspecified communication error
  -6 = local user $to unknown on host $smtp
  -7 = transmission of message failed
  -8 = argument $to empty
  -9 = no message specified in call to MailMsg or MailFile
  -10 = no file name specified in call to SendFile or MailFile
  -11 = file not found
  -12 = not available in singlepart mode
   $Mail::Sender::Error contains a textual description of last error.


METHODS

Open
 Open([from [, replyto [, to [, smtp [, subject [, headers]]]]]])
 Open({[from => "somebody@somewhere.com"] , [to => "else@nowhere.com"] [...]})

Opens a new message. If some parameters are unspecified or empty, it uses the parameters passed to the ``$Sender=new Mail::Sender(...)'';

See new Mail::Sender for info about the parameters.

Returns ref to the Mail::Sender object if successfull, a negative error code if not.

OpenMultipart
 OpenMultipart([from [, replyto [, to [, smtp [, subject [, headers [, boundary]]]]]]])
 OpenMultipart({[from => "somebody@somewhere.com"] , [to => "else@nowhere.com"] [...]})

Opens a multipart message. If some parameters are unspecified or empty, it uses the parameters passed to the $Sender=new Mail::Sender(...).

See new Mail::Sender for info about the parameters.

Returns ref to the Mail::Sender object if successfull, a negative error code if not.

MailMsg
 MailMsg([from [, replyto [, to [, smtp [, subject [, headers]]]]]], message)
 MailMsg({[from => "somebody@somewhere.com"]
          [, to => "else@nowhere.com"] [...], msg => "Message"})

Sends a message. If a mail in $sender is opened it gets closed and a new mail is created and sent. $sender is then closed. If some parameters are unspecified or empty, it uses the parameters passed to the ``$Sender=new Mail::Sender(...)'';

See new Mail::Sender for info about the parameters.

The module was made so that you could create an object initialized with all the necesary options and then send several messages without need to specify the SMTP server and others each time. If you need to send only one mail using MailMsg() or MailFile() you do not have to create a named object and then call the method. You may do it like this :

 (new Mail::Sender)->MailMsg({smtp => 'mail.company.com', ...});

Returns ref to the Mail::Sender object if successfull, a negative error code if not.

MailFile
 MailFile([from [, replyto [, to [, smtp [, subject [, headers]]]]]], message, file(s))
 MailFile({[from => "somebody@somewhere.com"]
           [, to => "else@nowhere.com"] [...],
           msg => "Message", file => "File"})

Sends one or more files by mail. If a mail in $sender is opened it gets closed and a new mail is created and sent. $sender is then closed. If some parameters are unspecified or empty, it uses the parameters passed to the ``$Sender=new Mail::Sender(...)'';

The file parameter may be a ``filename'', a ``list, of, file, names'' or a \@list of file names.

see new Mail::Sender for info about the parameters.

Just keep in mind that parameters like ctype, charset and encoding will be used for the attached file, not the body of the message. If you want to specify those parameters for the body you have to use b_ctype, b_charset and b_encoding. Sorry.

Returns ref to the Mail::Sender object if successfull, a negative error code if not.

Send
 Send(@strings)

Prints the strings to the socket. Doesn't add any end-of-line characters. Doesn't encode the data! You should use \r\n as the end-of-line!

UNLESS YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY SURE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING YOU SHOULD USE SendEnc() INSTEAD!

Returns 1 if successfull.

SendLine
 SendLine(@strings)

Prints the strings to the socket. Adds the end-of-line character at the end. Doesn't encode the data! You should use \r\n as the end-of-line!

UNLESS YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY SURE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING YOU SHOULD USE SendEnc() INSTEAD!

Returns 1 if successfull.

print
Alias to SendEnc().

Keep in mind that you can't write :

        print $sender "...";

you have to use

        $sender->print("...");

If you want to be able to print into the message as if it was a normal file handle take a look at GetHandle()

SendEnc
 SendEnc(@strings)

Prints the strings to the socket. Doesn't add any end-of-line characters.

Encodes the text using the selected encoding (none/Base64/Quoted-printable)

Returns 1 if successfull.

SendLineEnc
 SendLineEnc(@strings)

Prints the strings to the socket. Add the end-of-line character at the end. Encodes the text using the selected encoding (none/Base64/Quoted-printable).

Do NOT mix up /Send(Line)?(Ex)?/ and /Send(Line)?Enc/! SendEnc does some buffering necessary for correct Base64 encoding, and /Send(Ex)?/ is not aware of that!

Usage of /Send(Line)?(Ex)?/ in non 7BIT parts not recommended. Using Send(encode_base64($string)) may work, but more likely it will not! In particular if you use several such to create one part, the data is very likely to get crippled.

Returns 1 if successfull.

SendEx
 SendEx(@strings)

Prints the strings to the socket. Doesn't add any end-of-line characters. Changes all end-of-lines to \r\n. Doesn't encode the data!

UNLESS YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY SURE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING YOU SHOULD USE SendEnc() INSTEAD!

Returns 1 if successfull.

SendLineEx
 SendLineEx(@strings)

Prints the strings to the socket. Adds an end-of-line character at the end. Changes all end-of-lines to \r\n. Doesn't encode the data!

UNLESS YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY SURE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING YOU SHOULD USE SendEnc() INSTEAD!

Returns 1 if successfull.

Part
 Part( I<description>, I<ctype>, I<encoding>, I<disposition> [, I<content_id>]);
 Part( [description => "desc"], [ctype], [encoding], [disposition], [content_id]});
 Prints a part header for the multipart message.
 The undef or empty variables are ignored.
description
The title for this part.

ctype
the content type (MIME type) of this part. May contain some other parameters, such as charset or name.

Defaults to ``application/octet-stream''.

encoding
the encoding used for this part of message. Eg. Base64, Uuencode, 7BIT ...

Defaults to ``7BIT''.

disposition
This parts disposition. Eg: 'attachment; filename=``send.pl'''.

Defaults to ``attachment''. If you specify ``none'' or ``'', the Content-disposition: line will not be included in the headers.

content_id
The content id of the part, used in multipart/related. If not specified, the header is not included.

Returns the Mail::Sender object if successfull, negative error code if not.

Body
 Body([charset [, encoding [, content-type]]]);
 Body({charset => '...', encoding => '...', ctype => '...', msg => '...');

Sends the head of the multipart message body. You can specify the charset and the encoding. Default is ``US-ASCII'',``7BIT'','text/plain'.

If you pass undef or zero as the parameter, this function uses the default value:

    Body(0,0,'text/html');

Returns the Mail::Sender object if successfull, negative error code if not.

SendFile
Alias to Attach()

Attach
 Attach( I<description>, I<ctype>, I<encoding>, I<disposition>, I<file>);
 Attach( { [description => "desc"] , [ctype => "ctype"], [encoding => "encoding"],
             [disposition => "disposition"], file => "file"});
 Sends a file as a separate part of the mail message. Only in multipart mode.
description
The title for this part.

ctype
the content type (MIME type) of this part. May contain some other parameters, such as charset or name.

Defaults to ``application/octet-stream''.

encoding
the encoding used for this part of message. Eg. Base64, Uuencode, 7BIT ...

Defaults to ``Base64''.

disposition
This parts disposition. Eg: 'attachment; filename=``send.pl'''. If you use 'attachment; filename=*' the * will be replaced by the respective names of the sent files.

Defaults to ``attachment; filename=*''. If you do not want to include this header use ``'' as the value.

file
The name of the file to send or a 'list, of, names' or a ['reference','to','a','list','of','filenames']. Each file will be sent as a separate part.

content_id
The content id of the message part. Used in multipart/related.
 Special values:
  "*" => the name of the file
  "#" => autoincremented number (starting from 0)

Returns the Mail::Sender object if successfull, negative error code if not.

Close
 $sender->Close;

Close and send the mail. This method should be called automatically when destructing the object, but you should call it yourself just to be sure it gets called. And you should do it as soon as possible to close the connection and free the socket.

The mail is being sent to server, but is not processed by the server till the sender object is closed!

Returns the Mail::Sender object if successfull, negative error code if not.

Cancel
 $sender->Cancel;

Cancel an opened message.

SendFile and other methods may set $sender->{'error'}. In that case ``undef $sender'' calls $sender->Cancel not $sender->Close!!!

Returns the Mail::Sender object if successfull, negative error code if not.

GetHandle
Returns a ``filehandle'' to which you can print the message or file to attach or whatever. The data you print to this handle will be encoded as necessary. Closing this handle closes either the message (for single part messages) or the part.
        $sender->Open({...});
        my $handle = $sender->GetHandle();
        print $handle "Hello world.\n"
        my ($mday,$mon,$year) = (localtime())[3,4,5];
        printf $handle "Today is %04d/%02d/%02d.", $year+1900, $mon+1, $mday;
        close $handle;

P.S.: There is a big difference between the handle stored in $sender->{socket} and the handle returned by this function ! If you print something to $sender->{socket} it will be sent to the server without any modifications, encoding, escaping, ... You should NOT touch the $sender->{socket} unless you really really know what you are doing.

@Mail::Sender::Errors
Contains the description of errors returned by functions in Mail::Sender.

Usage: @Mail::Sender::Errors[$sender->{error}]


FUNCTIONS

GuessCType
        $ctype = GuessCType $filename;

Guesses the content type based on the filename (actually ... the extension).


CONFIG

If you create a file named Sender.config in the same directory where Sender.pm resides, this file will be ``require''d as soon as you ``use Mail::Sender'' in your script. Of course the Sender.config MUST ``return a true value'', that is it has to be succesfully compiled and the last statement must return a true value. You may use this to forbide the use of Mail::Sender to some users.

You may define the default settings for new Mail::Sender objects and do a few more things.

The default options are stored in hash %Mail::Sender::default. You may use all the examples you'd use in new, Open, OpenMultipart, MailMsg or MailFile.

 Eg.
  %default = (
    smtp => 'mail.mccann.cz',
    from => Win32::LoginName.'@mccann.cz',
    client => Win32::NodeName.'mccann.cz'
  );
  # of course you will use your own mail server here !

The other options you may set here (or later of course) are $Mail::Sender::SITE_HEADERS and $Mail::Sender::NO_X_MAILER.

The $Mail::Sender::SITE_HEADERS may contain headers that will be added to each mail message sent by this script, the $Mail::Sender::NO_X_MAILER disables the header item specifying that the message was sent by Mail::Sender.

!!! $Mail::Sender::SITE_HEADERS may NEVER end with \r\n !!!

If you want to set the $Mail::Sender::SITE_HEADERS for every script sent from your server without your users being able to change it you may use this hack:

 $loginname = something_that_identifies_the_user();
 *Mail::Sender::SITE_HEADERS = \"X-Sender: $loginname via $0";

You may even ``install'' your custom function that will be evaluated for each message just before contacting the server. You may change all the options from within as well as stop sending the message.

All you have to do is to create a function named SiteHook in Mail::Sender package. This function will get the Mail::Sender object as its first argument. If it returns a TRUE value the message is sent, if it returns FALSE the sending is canceled and the user gets ``Site specific error'' error message.

If you want to give some better error message you may do it like this :

 sub SiteHook {
  my $self = shift;
  if (whatever($self)) {
    $self->{'error'} = SITEERROR;
    $Mail::Sender::Error = "I don't like this mail";
    return 0
  } else {
    return 1;
  }
 }

This example will ensure the from address is the users real address :

 sub SiteHook {
  my $self = shift;
  $self->{fromaddr} = getlogin.'@yoursite.com';
  $self->{from} = getlogin.'@yoursite.com';
  1;
 }

Please note that at this stage the from address is in two different object properties.

$self->{from} is the address as it will appear in the mail, that is it may include the full name of the user or any other comment ( ``Jan Krynicky <jenda@krynicky.cz>'' for example), while the $self->{fromaddr} is realy just the email address per se and it will be used in conversation with the SMTP server. It must be without comments (``jenda@krynicky.cz'' for example)!

Without write access to .../lib/Mail/Sender.pm or .../lib/Mail/Sender.config your users will then be unable to get rid of this header. Well ... everything is doable, if he's cheeky enough ... :-(

So if you take care of some site with virtual servers for several clients and implement some policy via SiteHook() or $Mail::Sender::SITE_HEADERS search the clients' scripts for ``SiteHook'' and ``SITE_HEADERS'' from time to time. To see who's cheating.


EXAMPLES

 use Mail::Sender;
 #$sender = new Mail::Sender { from => 'somebody@somewhere.com',
    smtp => 'mail.yourISP.com', boundary => 'This-is-a-mail-boundary-435427'};
 # # if you do not care about errors. (But you should!)
 # # otherwise use
 #
 ref ($sender = new Mail::Sender { from => 'somebody@somewhere.com',
       smtp => 'mail.yourISP.com', boundary => 'This-is-a-mail-boundary-435427'})
 or die "Error($sender) : $Mail::Sender::Error\n";
 ref $sender->Open({to => 'friend@other.com', subject => 'Hello dear friend'})
         or die "Error: $Mail::Sender::Error\n";
 my $FH = $sender->GetHandle();
 print $FH "How are you?\n\n";
 print $FH <<'*END*';
 I've found these jokes.
  Doctor, I feel like a pack of cards.
  Sit down and I'll deal with you later.
  Doctor, I keep thinking I'm a dustbin.
  Don't talk rubbish.
 Hope you like'em. Jenda
 *END*
 $sender->Close;
 # or
 # close $FH;

###

 $sender->Open({to => 'mama@home.org, papa@work.com',
                cc => 'somebody@somewhere.com',
                subject => 'Sorry, I'll come later.'});
 $sender->SendLineEnc("I'm sorry, but due to a big load of work,
    I'll come at 10pm at best.");
 $sender->SendLineEnc("\nHi, Jenda");
 $sender->Close;

###

 $sender->OpenMultipart({to => 'Perl-Win32-Users@activeware.foo',
                         subject => 'Mail::Sender.pm - new module'});
 $sender->Body;
 $sender->SendEnc(<<'*END*');
 Here is a new module Mail::Sender.
 It provides an object based interface to sending SMTP mails.
 It uses a direct socket connection, so it doesn't need any
 additional program.
 Enjoy, Jenda
 *END*
 $sender->Attach(
  {description => 'Perl module Mail::Sender.pm',
   ctype => 'application/x-zip-encoded',
   encoding => 'Base64',
   disposition => 'attachment; filename="Sender.zip"; type="ZIP archive"',
   file => 'sender.zip'
  });
 $sender->Close;

###

 $sender->OpenMultipart({to => 'Perl-Win32-Users@activeware.foo',
                         subject => 'Mail::Sender.pm - new version'});
 $sender->Body({ msg => <<'*END*' });
 Here is a new module Mail::Sender.
 It provides an object based interface to sending SMTP mails.
 It uses a direct socket connection, so it doesn't need any
 additional program.
 Enjoy, Jenda
 *END*
 $sender->Attach(
  {description => 'Perl module Mail::Sender.pm',
   ctype => 'application/x-zip-encoded',
   encoding => 'Base64',
   disposition => 'attachment; filename="Sender.zip"; type="ZIP archive"',
   file => 'sender.zip'
  });
 $sender->Close;

### A nice way to use the module is:

 use Mail::Sender;
 eval {
 (new Mail::Sender)
        ->OpenMultipart({smtp=> 'jenda.krynicky.cz', to => 'jenda@krynicky.cz',subject => 'Mail::Sender.pm - new version'})
        ->Body({ msg => <<'*END*' })
 Here is a new module Mail::Sender.
 It provides an object based interface to sending SMTP mails.
 It uses a direct socket connection, so it doesn't need any
 additional program.
 Enjoy, Jenda
 *END*
        ->Attach({
                description => 'Perl module Mail::Sender.pm',
                ctype => 'application/x-zip-encoded',
                encoding => 'Base64',
                disposition => 'attachment; filename="Sender.zip"; type="ZIP archive"',
                file => 'W:\jenda\packages\Mail\Sender\Mail-Sender-0.7.12.tar.gz'
        })
        ->Close();
 } or print "Error sending mail: $Mail::Sender::Error\n";

###

If everything you need is to send a simple message you may use:

 use Mail::Sender;
 ref ($sender = new Mail::Sender({from => 'somebody@somewhere.com',smtp
 => 'mail.yourISP.com'})) or die "$Mail::Sender::Error\n";
 (ref ($sender->MailMsg({to =>'Jenda@Krynicky.czX', subject => 'this is a test',
                         msg => "Hi Johnie.\nHow are you?"}))
  and print "Mail sent OK."
 )
 or die "$Mail::Sender::Error\n";

or

 use Mail::Sender;
 eval {
        (new Mail::Sender)
        ->MailMsg({smtp => 'mail.yourISP.com',
                from => 'somebody@somewhere.com',
                to =>'Jenda@Krynicky.czX',
                subject => 'this is a test',
                msg => "Hi Johnie.\nHow are you?"})
 }
 or die "$Mail::Sender::Error\n";

If you want to attach some files:

 use Mail::Sender;
 ref ($sender = new Mail::Sender({from => 'somebody@somewhere.com',smtp
 => 'mail.yourdomain.com'})) or die "$Mail::Sender::Error\n";
 (ref ($sender->MailFile(
  {to =>'you@address.com', subject => 'this is a test',
   msg => "Hi Johnie.\nI'm sending you the pictures you wanted.",
   file => 'image1.jpg,image2.jpg'
  }))
  and print "Mail sent OK."
 )
 or die "$Mail::Sender::Error\n";
 __END__

If you want to send a HTML mail:

 use Mail::Sender;
 open IN, $htmlfile or die "Cannot open $htmlfile : $!\n";
 $sender = new Mail::Sender {smtp => 'mail.yourdomain.com'};
 $sender->Open({ from => 'your@address.com', to => 'other@address.com', subject => 'HTML test',
        headers => "MIME-Version: 1.0\r\nContent-type: text/html\r\nContent-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit"
 }) or die $Mail::Sender::Error,"\n";
 while (<IN>) { $sender->Send($_) };
 close IN;
 $sender->Close();
 __END__

If you want to send a HTML with some inline images :

 use strict;
 use Mail::Sender;
 my $recipients = 'somebody@somewhere.com';
 my $sender = new Mail::Sender {smtp => 'your.mailhost.com'};
 if ($sender->OpenMultipart({from => 'itstech2@gate.net', to => $recipients,
                       subject => 'Embedded Image Test', subtype => 'related',
                       boundary => 'boundary-test-1',
                       type => 'multipart/related'}) > 0) {
  $sender->Attach(
         {description => 'html body',
         ctype => 'text/html; charset=us-ascii',
         encoding => '7bit',
         disposition => 'NONE',
         file => 'test.html'
   });
  $sender->Attach(
   {description => 'ed\'s gif',
    ctype => 'image/gif',
    encoding => 'base64',
    disposition => "inline; filename=\"apache_pb.gif\";\r\nContent-ID: <ed1>",
    file => 'apache_pb.gif'
   });
  $sender->Close() or die "Close failed! $Mail::Sender::Error\n";
 } else {
  die "Cannot send mail: $Mail::Sender::Error\n";
 }
 __END__

In the HTML you'll have this : ... <IMG src=``cid:ed1''> ...

Please keep in mind that the image name is unimportant, the Content-ID is what counts!

If you want to send a mail with an attached file you just got from a HTML form:

 #!perl
 use CGI;
 use Mail::Sender;
 $query = new CGI;
 # uploading the file...
 $filename = $query->param('mailformFile');
 if ($filename ne ""){
  $tmp_file = $query->tmpFileName($filename);
 }
 $sender = new Mail::Sender {from => 'script@krynicky.cz',smtp => 'mail.krynicky.czX'};
 $sender->OpenMultipart({to=> 'jenda@krynicky.czX',subject=> 'test CGI attach'});
 $sender->Body();
 $sender->Send(<<"*END*");
 This is just a test of mail with an uploaded file.
 Jenda
 *END*
 $sender->SendFile(
          {encoding => 'Base64',
    description => $filename,
    ctype => $query->uploadInfo($filename)->{'Content-Type'},
    disposition => "attachment; filename = $filename",
           file => $tmp_file
          });
 $sender->Close();
 print "Content-type: text/plain\n\nYes, it's sent\n\n";

If you want to confirm reading you add :

        headers => "X-Confirm-Reading-To: $from_address"

if you want delivery report you add :

        headers => "Return-receipt-to: $from_address"

if both :

        headers => "X-Confirm-Reading-To: $from_address\r\nReturn-receipt-to: $from_address"

WARNING

DO NOT mix Open(Multipart)|Send(Line)(Ex)|Close with MailMsg or MailFile. Both Mail(Msg/File) close any Open-ed mail. Do not try this:

 $sender = new Mail::Sender ...;
 $sender->OpenMultipart...;
 $sender->Body;
 $sender->Send("...");
 $sender->MailFile({file => 'something.ext');
 $sender->Close;

This WON'T work!!!


BUGS

I'm sure there are many. Please let me know if you find any.

The problem with multiline responses from some SMTP servers (namely qmail) is solved.


DISCLAIMER

This module is based on SendMail.pm Version : 1.21 that appeared in Perl-Win32-Users@activeware.com mailing list. I don't remember the name of the poster and it's not mentioned in the script. Thank you mr. undef.


AUTHOR

Jan Krynicky <Jenda@Krynicky.cz> http://Jenda.Krynicky.cz

With help of Rodrigo Siqueira <rodrigo@insite.com.br>, Ed McGuigan <itstech1@gate.net>, and others.


COPYRIGHT

Copyright (c) 1997-2002 Jan Krynicky <Jenda@Krynicky.cz>. All rights reserved.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself. There is only one aditional condition, you may NOT use this module for SPAMing! NEVER! (see http://spam.abuse.net/ for definition)